Program: Film Connection for Cinematography

Screenwriting

What does a screenwriter do?

The screenwriter is the person who creates, takes, or adapts an idea and formulates a screenplay. Without the writer, there would be no movie. Period. He or she is the person who starts the ball rolling down the hill. Sure, some films are made backwards. There are studios who come up with ideas and package actors, then go find a writer. Nevertheless, the film getting made still hinges on the writer or group of writers’ ability to put together a viable, industry quality screenplay.

The Script is King

This is a term used throughout both Hollywood and “Indiewood.” What it means is that at the end of the day, the most important element comes down to the script. 

Many of the best films in cinema are don’t owe their greatness to the actors’ stellar performances, deft action sequences, or amazing effects.

These films are considered great because of the script or screenplay. Movies such as “Pulp Fiction” and “Chinatown” are renowned for their reliance on tight action and plot. Movies such as “Streetcar Named Desire” “Casablanca” and “Ordinary People” are known for their dialogue, material that enabled actors to give vivid, powerful performances. Your job, as the writer, is to produce the KILLER SCRIPT.

The Killer Script

The “Killer Script” is the script that isn’t merely good. It is beyond good, and it is beyond great. If you have a Killer Script, when someone reads it, they read it in one sitting and immediately get back to you.

When an actor reads it, he or she gets his or her agent on the phone. When a production company reads it, the project is green lit.

Here is a universal truth that many people do not know (even many who think they are in the movie business): KILLER SCRIPTS GET MADE. Remember that. It’s the good, mediocre, and downright horrible scripts that constitute 99% of what other writers put out there. Our Screenwriting Film School Program is geared towards empowering you to write your own KILLER SCRIPT.


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With the right experience and connections, you can jumpstart your career in the film industry.

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Note: If you are serious about learning real-world audio production the way we teach it, answer the following questions to expedite your admissions process.

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*When paid in full, tuition will receive a $2000 reduction, bringing the program’s total tuition of $12,200 to $10,200 not including administrative fees.

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Meet our Mentors

Why learn from teachers when you can learn from the professionals?

Zef Cota Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Zef Cota Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Alphabet City Films is a film production company based in New York City, NY. We are a collective of writers, directors, producers, cinematographers, and other talented filmmakers. We have created many short films, and recently produced our first feature length film: The Trouble. Request an Invitation

Jim DeGroot Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Jim DeGroot Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Clients: Green Bay Packers, Disney, National Guard, Doritos, ABC World News, Good Morning America, St. Joseph’s Medical Centers, Homeland Security Request an Invitation

Eero Johnson Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Eero Johnson Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“I’m Eero Johnson. I’m a film and video producer living in Bellingham, Washington. For over ten years I’ve been creating commercials, corporate videos, web videos, sales DVD’s, music videos … whatever it takes to get your message to your audience. I have a great group of clients and I love what I do.” Request an Invitation

Chris Varner Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Chris Varner Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

In a career spanning nearly 20 years, Chris has worked in almost every facet of video production, from lens to post. His credits include EPK work on “Sleepy Hollow”, “Under The Dome”, “The Longest Ride”, “We’re The Millers”, “Iron Man 3”, “One Tree Hill” and more. Request an Invitation

John Raffo Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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John Raffo Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

John Raffo started as a photographer in New York before turning his attention to screenwriting. Over the last twenty years he’s worked on a variety of credited and uncredited projects (including, DRAGON, THE BRUCE LEE STORYTHE RELIC, and THE INTERPRETER”). His original screenplay RENKO VEGA AND THE JENNIFER NINE appeared on the 2011 Black List. THE 7TH SWORD is his first story written directly as a graphic novel. Request an Invitation

Shawn Hamer Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Shawn Hamer Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

17 time Emmy award winning DP/Camera Operator, Producer and Director with over 20 years of experience in the Film, Television and Audio business. Extensive professional experience for top clients across the country from Miami to Anchorage, from New York to San Francisco. International production experience in South & Central America as well as China for both documentary and commercial production. Well versed in handling both low and high budget production ($1k to $3.5m). Professional still shooter as well with full ProFoto strobe lighting and speedlight kits. Lots of contacts in the Detroit metro area and in major cities across the globe for every type and size production – full cinema production, 3D production, aerial shoots, camera car, crane/jib, etc. I also have shot, explored, camped and lived all over Michigan – I know the state EXTREMELY well, particularly it’s remotest regions. Request an Invitation

Sebastian Triscari Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Sebastian Triscari Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“Young people are the future of this industry. Mentorship programs like The Film Connection are the most efficient and effective ways for anyone who has a passion to gain the information and experience necessary to be successful!” Request an Invitation

Mitch Kaufman Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Mitch Kaufman Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

A native of Atlantic Beach, Mitch Kaufmann has been offering video services to area businesses and residents since 1984. He started Atlantic Video Productions by shooting weddings, business seminars, and sporting events. Request an Invitation

Horacio Jones Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Horacio Jones Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Award winning director, Horacio Jones is a multi-faceted Video Producer, Director, and Editor. He has turned CinemaViva into one of the leading video production studios in San Diego. In addition to making outstanding corporate video productions, he is committed to making socially conscious and inspiring films and documentaries that bring magic into peoples lives in fun and colorful ways. Request an Invitation

Deen Olatunji Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Deen Olatunji Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Deen’s most recent film is “Warfare”, which was screened at the heart of Dallas and several other cities across the United States. Deen has also worked on several feature, short films and other content, which include “Kanaani” (Popular TV Series”), “The Call”, “King Sacrifice”, “Who Am I” , and “Dancing With The Docs-Texas”. (TV Series). He is currently working on his next projects “The Alarm Clock” (Short Film) and “Eze Back To School”  (Feature Film) all coming up in fall and winter 2016. Deen believes the RRFC program is great because it’s one of the few reputable schools that teach you on the field which he states is a great way of learning. Request an Invitation

Rex Piano Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Rex Piano Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“The Film Connection allows aspiring writers to work with professionals.  The students not only learn theory, but practical applications to screenwriting.  I wish it was around when I was a student.” — Rex Piano, Producer/Director, Impact Earth, Fall of Hyperion, Rome: Rise and Fall of an Empire, Murder Dot Com, Hope Ranch, The Month of August Request an Invitation

Matt Kaczkowski Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Matt Kaczkowski Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Matt Kaczkowski graduated from Winona State University with a BA in Mass Communications Broadcasting. He spent three years as a DJ and produced an award-winning radio production.  Prior to starting SilverWater Productions, Matt was an event planner and A/V services coordinator for 4 years. Matt’s passion for film and video is a catalyst for SilverWater’s success. Request an Invitation

Ivan Alzuro Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Ivan Alzuro Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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“Unlike the local University, Film Connection sends us committed and focused students. We have turned 1 student into full-time contractor – that says it all!” Request an Invitation

Daniel Lir Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Daniel Lir Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Dream Team Directors is a prestigious directorial team founded by Bayou Bennett and Daniel Lir. Their company motto, “Let our dream team manifest your dream”, symbolizes the expansion and positive attention they win for their celebrity and high-profile brand clients and collaborators such as Adidas, MTV, Coldplay, P. Diddy, Smashbox Cosmetics, Atlantic Records, Chrome Hearts, Oscar De La Renta, Oscar nominee Mark Ruffalo, Golden Globe nominee Anthony Mackie, Matt Bennett of the “Big Bang Theory” and Lea Michele of Fox’s “Glee.” Request an Invitation

Rocco Michaluk Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Rocco Michaluk Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Michaluk has been creating award winning Film & TV productions for over 15 years. His Film Clients include Columbia Pictures, Indian PaintBrush, PBS, NBC, American Empirical Pictures and Fountainbrush Films. His Television clients include NBC, Television Academy / Emmy’s, MTV, Viacom, E! Entertainment, CBS, ABC, Travel Channel, Leftfield Pictures, PETA, and others. Request an Invitation

Alejandra Huerta Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Alejandra Huerta Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Alejandra Huerta specializes in On-Screen Promotions, Executive Presentation Tapes and Sizzle Reels. She started her career with Andromeda in Miami offering Production Services to MTV Latin America as an editor for on-air promotions. She then relocated to New York where she became a successful producer and editor for Viacom and NBC Universal. After her professional experience in NY she relocated to Florida where she continues to manage, produce and edit projects at Andromeda Productions. Request an Invitation

Joaquin Palma Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Joaquin Palma Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“The thing I admire most about the program is that it pairs you with people doing the job that you are aspiring to do. In doing that, I feel it gets rid of the “glamour” that people associate with this business, and helps them realize that it is, in fact, A JOB. It takes hard work, a lot of practice and a sincere courtesy towards one’s colleagues to get ahead and stay relevant; not that tired stereotype of the suffering artist that won’t settle for anything less than his vision of perfection! I don’t think they teach you that at traditional film schools.” — Joaquin Franco Palma Joaquin Franco Palma was born and raised in Los Angeles and is a first-generation American. Having started his career as a production assistant, Joaquin has gone on to become an award winning writer and director of both independent features and TV; most notably, as a staff writer on the Emmy nominated HULU series, EAST LOS HIGH. Aside from writing for the screen, Joaquin is also a published author of fiction and is a youth writing volunteer for the NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND and NOSOTROS ORGANIZATION programs. Request an Invitation

Drew Mason Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Drew Mason Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

I started getting serious about making videos during summer backpacking trips with my friends between college semesters at Central Michigan University. Shortly after graduating, I was asked to produce a local TV show. I jumped at the opportunity and never looked back. Since then, I’ve produced videos for documentaries, national ad campaigns, and commercials for multinational companies. Recently I was part of a team that produced videos for Lansing’s Silver Bells in the City, and we received an Emmy Award for special event coverage. My introduction to the business wasn’t with videography; I was a wedding DJ for nearly 8 years. Through this experience, I discovered that weddings are not only among my favorite things to be a part of, but also to film. I love capturing the excitement, love, and energy surrounding them. When I’m not editing videos – haha, funny joke – I like to make music. In fact, I serenaded my wife Amanda with my ukulele for our first kiss. True story! I also try to get out to the backcountry wilderness with just a backpack from time to time, especially in beautiful northern Michigan. Request an Invitation

David McClain Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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David McClain Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Credits: Coca Cola, Google, Dateline, Travel Channel, NBC Request an Invitation

Demetria Kalodimos Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Demetria Kalodimos Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

In 2000, Demetria established Genuine Human Productions, writing, directing, shooting and editing true stories about real people…genuine humans. Demetria Kalodimos has anchored and reported television news for more than 30 years. She’s won some of journalism’s most prestigious awards including 15 regional Emmys, 2 National Headliners and 2 Investigative Reporters and Editors Awards. Request an Invitation

Grant Salisbury Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Grant Salisbury Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Over fifteen years post production experience in Orlando—Grant has provided video editorial, 2D & 3D animations, and motion graphics for a multitude of media clients through his post production company, GFX Creative. Short & Long Format Video Editorial, Event & Theme Park Animations, Infomercials, Broadcast Commercials, Corporate Communications and Interactive Media for The Walt Disney Company, Universal Studios, Sea World, Lockheed-Martin, AAA Insurance, 3M, Siemens, Honda, A&D Medical, Toyota, FedEx and others. Request an Invitation

Jae Macallan Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Jae Macallan Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Jae Macallan is the owner, producer, and lead editor for Yoyostring Creative in Seattle, WA., with satalite offices in Portland, OR and San Diego, CA.  Yoyostring produces traditional video as well as animation, 360 VR, live video switching and video mapping.  Request an Invitation

Ron Osborn Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Ron Osborn Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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“Simply put, there is no better or more effective way to teach anything than one-on-one, mentor to student.  This is what the Film Connection does.” — Ron Osborn A writer/producer in television for 35 years, Ron has been nominated for 7 Emmys, 3 Cable Ace Awards, and 2 Writers Guild Awards on shows like MOONLIGHTING, THE WEST WING, and the adult animated DUCKMAN.  He has written pilots for every primetime network, numerous cable networks, as well as movies like MEET JOE BLACK; and has developed feature projects with Steven Speilberg, Ron Howard, and George Lucas, among others. . Request an Invitation

Sam Borowski Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Sam Borowski Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“The Recording Radio and Film Connection is such an effective program, because it takes the student out of the classroom and puts them in the very field they seek to be a part of. With mentors that actually work in the student’s respective field, they get first-hand knowledge of how everything works and just what to do. I think it’s the best way to get hands-on experience and the lessons learned are very valuable. I also think that the interview process helps to match a student with a mentor that will be right for them.” – Sam Borowski Directed and produced the feature film, Night Club starring Oscar-Winner Ernest Borgnine, Natasha Lyonne and Paul Sorvino. Wrote and produced the feature-length documentary Creature Feature: 60 Years of the Gill-Man with Oscar-Winner Benicio Del Toro and narrated by 2-time Emmy-Winner Keith David. Also directed and produced the film Maniac. Request an Invitation

John Lafia Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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John Lafia Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

John Lafia is a director and writer, known for Child’s Play (1988), Child’s Play 2 (1990), Man’s Best Friend(1993) and 10.5 (2004) Request an Invitation

Brian Dryden Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Brian Dryden Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Clients: The North Face, Cherokee Sports, LSU Request an Invitation

Peter Foldy Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Peter Foldy Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“For a fraction of the price of a university course, students of the Radio, Record and Film Connection receive one-on-one consultation and mentoring from a seasoned film professional. It is an opportunity for an exchange of meaningful ideas and for some, even a chance to network, an essential requirement to make an in-road in the film business.” Request an Invitation

Eric Abrams Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Eric Abrams Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

“Unlike many programs that stress theory over doing, our goal is for our students to have completed a 1st draft of a screenplay or be well on their way in 10 sessions.”   Credits I’m proud of: “Married…With Children,” “Gary & Mike,” ‘Live & Maddie,” and an unaired Muppet pilot. Request an Invitation

Monty Mickelson Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Monty Mickelson Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Freelance Journalist, Financial Writer, Corporate Communications Copywriter, Writer of Corporate Training and Life Skills Videoscripts, Public Relations Account Manager, Special Events Promotion and Media Wrangling, Award-Winning Published Novelist, and Feature Film Screenwriter. Request an Invitation

Daniela Larsen Learn Screenwriting Mentor

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Daniela Larsen Learn Screenwriting Mentor

Background

Daniela Larsen is the former CEO of Creative Media Education. She created and expanded education & certifications in Digital Media, Film, Cyber Security, Leadership and Technology. She also developed strategic partnerships in the private and public sector to make this education and training accessible to the public. Finally, she used digital media, documentaries and non profit experience to create opportunities for cause marketing, tell the stories that have real impact and increase the reach of online education to the remotest places in the world. She is currently the Executive Director & Founder of Small Candles Education & Economic Development, the CEO of the Navanas Institute and a Certified Partner for Infusionsoft. Request an Invitation

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This is your curriculum.

Lesson One: Getting Started

We dissect a script to find out what makes it a killer script. We also discuss the importance of reading classic screenplays and begin understanding the essential elements that all good screenplays have in common.

Lesson Two: The Story

Everything starts with the story. What story are you trying to tell? Is it based on a true story, a book, or some other published work (an adapted screenplay), or an original idea that you came up with (an original screenplay)? You will learn what it really means to “write what you know” and that every script has a beginning, middle and end.

Lesson Three: The Three Act Structure and Plot Points

Pretty much all movies follow the same plot format, which consists of three separate sections of a film to tell a story. This is called the 3-Act Structure.

Act One: The Setup

  • Exposition
  • Main Character
  • Dramatic Premise
  • Dramatic Situation
  • Inciting Incident

Act Two: The Confrontation

  • Obstacles
  • First Culmination
  • Midpoint

Act Three: The Resolution

  • Climax
  • Denouement

Homework

Lesson Four: Character

Your characters must be alive. Your characters must be real. Some of the greatest screenplays of all time are great not just because of the memorable lead and supporting characters, but the one-line characters that are featured. Sometimes a character can say one line, and you instantly feel you know him or her. Every character in your screenplay (especially your lead characters) has to have substance. Substance is achieved by back story.
  • The Reality
  • Back Story
  • Character Arcs
  • Taking What You See
  • Supporting Characters
  • Homework

Lesson Five: Theme/Genre

This lesson defines the kind of film you are writing. Genre is defined as a category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, marked by a distinctive style, form, or content. For films, genre is the form of film that your story is going to reveal.

Genres include:

  • Comedy
  • Drama
  • Action
  • Musical
  • Thriller
  • Horror
  • Western
  • Science Fiction
  • Fantasy
  • Satire

As well as these variations:

  • Dramedy (Drama and Comedy)
  • Black Comedy
  • Film Noir
  • Romantic Comedy
  • Street Drama
  • Horror Comedy
  • Musical Comedy
  • Crime Thriller
“Theme” is different from genre. A theme addresses the question “What’s it about?” in a topical, idealistic sense. A story can be made deeper by adding a theme.

Examples of themes include:

  • Revenge
  • Loyalty
  • Love
  • Forgotten Love
  • Justice
  • Betrayal
  • Friendship
  • Faith
Additionally, this lesson will spend time getting you ready to sell your screenplay.
  • Identifying the Genre
  • The Two Line Pitch
  • The Two Movie Pitch
  • Homework

Lesson 6: Actions and Descriptions

A screenplay has to move. We’ve talked about having a beginning, a middle and an end. All of the scenes within the three acts must be targeted to move the story along, whether it’s character exposition or action.
  • The Novel vs. The Screenplay
  • Write What’s Seen
  • Writing Scene Action
  • Shooting Scripts vs. Reading Scripts
  • Homework

Lesson 7: Formatting

If you submit a script to a literary agent, and it is typed in Microsoft Word in Times New Roman font, it will most likely never be read and end up in the trash. Screenplays have to follow certain rules:
  • They need to be formatted correctly.
  • They need to be the proper length. A screenplay page is roughly a minute of movie length, so a 120 page screenplay is a 2 hour movie.
  • They need to be printed and presented correctly
In marketing, “packaging is everything.” If you plan on selling your script or raising money to produce your own film, you need to know how to format and present your finished screenplay.
  • Which Screenwriting Software to Use
  • Your Title Page
  • Printing
  • Homework

Lesson 8: Dialogue

When writing dialogue, you’re not writing what looks good on the page. You’re writing what sounds good. One of the best ways to become good at dialogue is to listen to the people around you. Every line you write should be able to be spoken aloud, and you should be able to visualize and hear your character saying that line of dialogue. You have to try to be as tight and as economical with your dialogue as possible. Try to never “over-write.” Again, this is a screenplay, not a novel. People rarely talk in paragraphs. Make all your words tight and to the point.
    • Giving Your Characters a Voice
    • A Word on Narration
    • Do You Ever Use It?
  • Homework

Lesson 9:Synopsis and Treatment

The short synopsis is a one to two paragraph summary of your story. Be careful here. You don’t want to give away the ending! You just want to give a quick rundown of what the story is about. This is another one of those tools that helps you both before you write (it gives you a short, tight picture of your story),and after you write (your short synopsis is many times the way to get your foot in the door).
  • The Long Synopsis
  • The Four Page Treatment
  • Homework

Lesson 10:The Scene Outline

Start getting excited, because you are very close to beginning your KILLER SCRIPT. The outline is an essential tool for many writers. Though many veteran WGA writers still use outlines, it’s quintessential for beginning writers who have never completed a script to have a general idea on where, specifically, they are going.
  • Scene Ordering
  • Marking The Plot Points, Acts, Midpoints and Climax
  • Sample Scene Outline
  • Your Guide
  • The Main Rule of Writing
  • Create Your Rock
  • Homework

Lesson 11:The First Draft

As we mentioned in the last chapter, the main rule of writing is to not be afraid to write crap. You have to understand that even the best writers in the world do not write brilliant masterpieces on their first drafts. Many of the greatest screenplays of all time have been written and rewritten numerous times over. Just focus, get excited, and begin to write.
  • Create Your Rock, Part Two
  • Pushing to the End
  • Homework

Lesson 12

You’ve finished your rough draft screenplay. Isn’t it a great feeling? It’s fantastic to hold those 120 or so pages, 3 hole punched, 2 brass brads and say, “I did this.” Okay, don’t get too confident. The script you hold in your hands you will show to NO ONE. EVER.
  • The First Read
  • The “Professional” First Draft
  • Making a Cohesive Story
  • Judging the Logic and Movement
  • Your Job
  • Homework

Lesson 13:Polishing

The first aspect of your script polish deals with tightening. As we stated in the last lesson, you MUST have a script that moves. After your first rewrite, you might have altered major aspects of the story. Now it is time to polish them. Polishing the script is like operating with a laser. Another way to look at it is that you’ve now shaped the rock, but it’s time to pull out the small chisel and start working away. “Tightening” is the process where you make the script shorter and quicker. There’s no such thing as a script that reads too fast. You need to be economical on your dialogue and your action, but not lose essential elements.
  • Good Tightening
  • Bad Tightening
  • Fixing a Scene’s Structure and Flow
  • Making It Error-Proof
  • The First 10 Pages
  • Your Job
  • Homework

Lesson 14:The Good Read

Know this: at this point in time you’re too close to your script. Even the most veteran of writers, when they are finished with their first drafts, might have an idea how good/bad their screenplay is, but they never truly know until they’ve gotten “The Good Read.” The Good Read is the read by an objective person who will cover your script and give you feedback. This shouldn’t be a friend or a family member, even if you find them critical or think they’re objective. They’re not. They know you and they have a sense of you, so their view of your script is always tainted.
  • Where to Find Good Readers
  • How to Interpret Their Notes
  • Homework

Lesson 15:Rewriting, Part Two

One of the essential steps in your second rewrite is to identify the problems that the “Good Readers” pointed out. What do you need to change? How do you change it? Again, the best way to improve something is to see how the problem areas in your script were resolved in a successful script. If one of your consistent notes from your readers were, “I wasn’t buying the action sequences,” for example, then you know you’re not writing great action sequences. Continuing with this example, you’d need to refer to at least two screenplays where the action sequences are known to be excellent. Always, always refer to what has worked in the past. That’s what makes this program and its approach to screenwriting instruction so powerful. We’re using the technique of “modeling” to create a KILLER SCRIPT. “Modeling” involves duplicating successful paths so that you can be successful as well. You’re going to be modeling your KILLER SCRIPT after the techniques and qualities that previous KILLER SCRIPTS had!
  • Don’t Be Afraid to Kill Your Babies
  • Go Back and Read
  • Your Job
  • Homework

Lesson 16:Agents

Literary agents serve to sell your screenplay in exchange for a 10% commission. They have the connections to the studios and the production companies who buy your script and potentially make it into a film. In essence, that’s what you’re paying the 10% for…their contacts and relationships. The more powerful the literary agent, the more pull he or she has with the studios and major production companies.
  • The Pitch
  • Referrals
  • The Query Letter
  • Getting Them to Read Your Script
  • Homework

Lesson 17:Selling Your Script

There are tons of scripts written each year. The Writers Guild of America (WGA) has less than 12,000 members. Of these members, only a small percentage are making a living by writing. Becoming a professional writer takes time, hard work, and talent. As we stated earlier in this program, if it was so easy to sell a screenplay for mid-six figures, everyone would be doing it. The best thing you can do to protect yourself and plan for success is to write a KILLER SCRIPT. That’s what matters in the end. If you can create a true Killer Script that’s backed up by good reads, and has been rewritten, and can potentially be reshaped (more on that in the next lesson), you have a much better chance at a sale.
  • Be Realistic
  • Production Companies
  • Don’t Be Afraid
  • Copywriting
  • Homework

Lesson 18:Rewriting, Part Three

Okay, so maybe your script isn’t selling. Maybe you can’t get an agent, even after you’ve gotten some great feedback. What are you doing wrong? Perhaps your script needs to be altered. Maybe if you wrote a thriller set in the 1970’s, it needs to be moved to present day. Maybe you’ve written your lead character as a male and you might need to change him to a female. There are so many variables. The key is, you need to be flexible and open to changing your script. A script is almost never finished. Once your script is optioned, it will be rewritten many times, and by time the screenplay makes it to the screen, the script may be completely different. You must be open to this.
  • Be Open to Changing Your Script
  • Writing is Rewriting, but…
  • Director’s Notes
  • Homework

Lesson 19:On Set/Credits/WGA

Sometimes it seems like the writer has one of the least important roles on set, and, in many ways, that’s true. You, as the writer, were the inspiration and the cause of a film. You created (or adapted) the ideal. As a result of that blueprint a movie will be made. And even if you singlehandedly wrestled that idea out from the depths of your imagination and have turned it into a great screenplay, it’s time to get out of the way. It’s true… when it comes time to shoot a film, the writer’s job is regulated to the sidelines. That’s exactly why, according to the WGA, the writer has to be paid in full 100% by the time production starts. Their work is done—kind of.
  • Your Job On the Set
  • Actor’s Notes
  • Credit Rules
  • The WGA
  • Homework

Lesson 20:Your Career as a Writer

The killer script is your ticket to making a career as a screenwriter. You can become a professional writer if you work at it persistently and regard this as a career not a hobby. As your read more, learn more, and write more scripts, remember to always look into the great screenplays you’ve studied and consider what worked and why it worked. Get to knowing and seeing what is on the page of screenplays in your mind’s eye. Recognize the problems you come across in those less-than-fantastic scripts you read (there will be many). In short, task yourself with developing a deep understanding of writing film. And even though the screenplay is a document of words that serves as the blueprint for a movie, always work to entice the reader who is holding that script in their hands. Make it enticing to read.
  • The Future
  • Branding Yourself
  • Establishing a Body of Work
  • Homework
Coursework is delivered via distance education and completed at a location determined by the student. Externship locations can be up to 60 miles away from the student’s address. The externship mentor will work with each student on structuring a specific schedule, the student agrees that he/she will be available to meet with the mentor for a minimum of two sessions per week.”

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