The Mentor/Apprentice Learning Approach for Film



 

The Radio/Film/Music Connection mentor learning programs are all they are advertised to be.  Webster's dictionary defines a mentor as a trusted counselor or guide or a tutor, coach. 

For instance, students who attend Film Connection and are interested in a career in the entertainment industry – such as wanting to learn how to be a producer or a director, or to learn about a career as a sportscaster, then they will be studying through a mentor program with a working professional as your teacher.  If this is the case then here are ten myths about today's contemporary trends in mentoring – valuable information you will want to know.

Whether you want to learn to be a film producer, or need to learn how to be a recording artist, or are interested in a career in radio, learning from an entertainment professional is the best way for you to learn the profession. Some of the myths include:  Mentoring is probably the most frequently used method of sharing knowledge in our society worldwide.

Those professionals with the what it takes to be a powerful learning influence should mentor.  Successful mentoring is about both parties receiving benefits. The best mentors are not always people who set out to be mentors. One-on-one, face-to-face mentoring is easier today thanks to the Internet and modern technology. 

Most professional executives can't afford the time it takes for mentoring. NOT TRUE. Mentoring is about helping someone else learn from you while you are both working. The reality is that it can increase on-the-job performance for both parties as well as provide valuable career accelerator. As mentors share their experiences, it is clear that taking the student out of the classroom for careers such as film, radio or recording works better.

Students who learn while they are on real film sets will learn by doing the job while they learn, one-on-one with a mentor who is a working professional in the area that they want to study.