Making Film School Work for You



 

Attending film school can be a very good option for those who can afford it.  There are good film programs at colleges and universities around the country.  Many programs have areas of specialization available hence you may study screenwriting, directing, cinematography or some other aspect of movie making.

Film school can provide opportunities.  Opportunities to use good equipment.  Opportunities to learn from qualified instructors.  Opportunities to make explorative films to develop your talent and to collaborate with fellow students along the way.  Whether or not a student chooses to make the most of these opportunities is entirely up to them.

Making film school work for you is key to getting the most out of it.  But it is also important to note that it is not necessary to attend film school to become a successful filmmaker. 

While film school can be great for some people, not everyone will thrive there.  There are some people who learn best by doing.  These people are often of the opinion that if they had the money to go to film school they’d rather spend it on making a movie.

But it’s always good to have someone instruct you on the basics of something.  That’s why mentoring-apprenticeship (externship) programs can be so ideal for some people.  Mentorships from Film Connection give students the chance to learn the basics of filmmaking while lending a hand on an actual film set.  Rather than sitting in a classroom hearing a teacher lecture, students work on a real set and are taught moviemaking by professional moviemakers.  For many, it is an ideal learning situation.

Participating in a Film Connection mentoring-apprenticeship (externship) program also allows you the freedom to make your own schedule.  You show up at prearranged times that work for you.  This makes it easier for those who need to work day jobs while following their true career path.  This also makes it easy to augment a traditional film school program with a mentor-apprenticeship (externship) working with true film professionals.

If you have the money to attend film school and you feel you are the kind of person who could make it work for you, by all means attend film school.  However if you are the kind of person who learns best through doing and would rather not spend the next four or five years in school, a mentor-apprentice (extern) program may be ideal for you.

Making film school work for you is often a matter of determining what type of film school is right for you.